Febrero 11, 2014

SILVERSUN PICKUPS  - Well Thought Out Twinkles

=

My latest obsession. The pickups on their guitars actually illustrate - in my mind - whatever silver sun might be..   humbuckers much?

Febrero 11, 2014

On the rare quality of exceptional living…

image

[ http://bit.ly/1eNEQyG ] 

Because I will recklessly abandon all insecurities and expose my true self to the world. I will become immune to the impact of your opinion and stand naked in a crowd of ideas; comfortable in knowing that while you married the mundane I explored the exceptional

7 Reasons Why You Will Never Do Anything Amazing With Your Life

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/raymmar-tirado/7-reasons-why-you-will-ne_b_4763143.html?ncid=edlinkusaolp00000009

Enero 20, 2014

Then, I turned around and walked to my room and closed my door and put my head under my pillow and let the quiet put things where they are supposed to be. 

The Perks of Being a Wallflower by Stephen Chbosky

Diciembre 28, 2013
Peruvian Navidad

I was born in Providence, Rhode Island. I’d lived my whole life in Massachusetts, until January 15, 2013, when I moved to Lima, Peru.

I celebrated my first Christmas away from home - in a new home - a few days ago. And in a few weeks I’ll celebrate 1 year of living in Peru with friends and family alike; friends I made here, family from here, and the few that I’m closest with, that have come to Peru from the US, to be a part of life here.

Celebrating Christmas here was a bit strange, in the most stunning kind of way. I suppose the Christmas experience here began on December 21st in Pamplona Alta, a hillside community hanging on the fringes of Limeño society. (the following recounts a Christmas celebration I helped arrange with TECHO Peru)

"We started with a few games, we played and sang songs, another female volunteer brought a nice little guitar. It was great fun. We ate a lot of paneton, and Patty’s mother made a fantastic batch of hot coco. They mix cinnamon into it here - delicious. There were nearly 20 kids. And we had presents for each one. My Adidas students supplied some great gifts. I hung out with Guillermo a bit and his sister was there for the whole thing. I looked around for the ones I knew, the consistent kids, and for the quieter ones who weren’t involved and just sat with them encouraging them and holding them. It was really nice. I actually had a very deep moment where, in the middle of the celebration, I shot back to the first Christmas we celebrated without my mom. What a strange a barren feeling that was. It made me feel so sad and at the same time so resolved. There I was with kids from the city she was born into, struggling their days out with their families in their little homes, just doing whatever they could to get by. The moment was cutting, but beautiful too; that after losing what I had lost, I could be a part of bringing little bits of happiness to a place where maybe it isn’t always so easy. I felt a bit infinite in that moment, so connected. I really feel like I’ve made some good choices in Peru. Not all perfect of course. Life is never perfect, by its nature. But it felt right, it all felt very manifest in a way."

Then, of course, there was the December 24-25th family celebration. It was awesome. I taught one English class that morning in Callao. It was pretty chill though. My student gave me a ride back home to Surquillo. Then I napped, because I’d gone surfing at 5:30 that morning. Yikes. Worth it though. 

Zach and I got ready to go out and get the ingredients for the mashed potatoes, which we’d committed to making for some 20 people. And in classic Zdav-T-rev fashion, we left way too late and the market was sold out of potatoes (who woulda thunk it, at 7pm, Christmas eve, in a city of 12 million?). We ventured to another market (success) and then off to the apartment where the family was gathering.

Prima Charito and her husband Jonathan were renting an apartment on the Costa Verde, which is beautiful. It was a nice place. We got there and hit the kitchen, peeling potatoes, cracking open a few cervezas and visiting with family. By the time we finished the potatoes, quite a few more people had arrived. And by the time we started to eat, maybe 10pm(?)(early for an authentic peruvian christmas, which traditionally starts at 12midnight), a bunch more had arrived. Avoiding onsets of fatigue, Zach and the cousins and I (and eventually some other extended family) ventured up a service ladder onto the roof, some 17 stories above the coastal cliffs. WHAT A VIEW! We found ourselves taking in the panorama of exploding fireworks, screaming along with the energy of the city at 12:00 midnight, Christmas day, 2013, in Lima Peru. Fireworks were exploding above us, below us, to the sides of the building. It was such a rush, and a moment of connectedness with the rest of the city. It felt big.

After returning to the apartment on the 3rd floor to hug and kiss the whole family, because it had officially become Christmas, we escaped for an adventure down the Malecon - a little Lima style cliff walk (for those from Rhode Island). We wrapped up the evening around 3:30AM and hitched a ride back with some extended family, having consumed at least some portion of two gigantic turkeys and a shmorgeshboard of other delicious things. Forgot to mention that the family put a santa hat on me at some point (and handed me a pillow for the classic saint nick belly), christening me Papa Noel. I was then commissioned to distribute gifts to the entire family, on camera(s).

Peruvian Navidad 2013, success. 

New Years 2014, bring it on. 

Surquillo, Lima, December 2013

Diciembre 5, 2013
Revolutionary Reflection

I saw his teeth and the cheeky grin with which he foretold history, I felt his handshake and, like a distant murmur, his formal goodbye. The night, folding in at contact with his words, overtook me again, enveloping me within it. But despite his words, I now knew… I knew that when the great guiding spirit cleaves humanity into two antagonistic halves, I would be with the people. I know this, I see it printed in the night sky that I, eclectic dissembler of doctrine and psychoanalyst of dogma, howling like one possessed, will assault the barricades or the trenches, will take my bloodstained weapon and, consumed with fury, slaughter any enemy who falls into my hands. And I see, as if a great exhaustion smothers this fresh exaltation, I see myself, immolated in the genuine revolution, the great equalizer of individual will, proclaiming the ultimate mea culpa. I feel my nostrils dilate, savoring the acrid smell of gunpowder and blood, the enemy’s death; I steel my body, ready to do battle, and prepare myself to be a sacred space within which the bestial howl of the triumphant proletariat can resound with new energy and new hope. 

From: The motorcycle Diaries: Notes on a Latin American Journey by Ernesto Che Guevara

Diciembre 4, 2013
19th General Assembly of the United Nations in New York

Che Guevara

At the United Nations

image


Spoken: December 11, 1964, 19th General Assembly of the United Nations in New York. 
First Published: 
Source: The Che Reader, Ocean Press, © 2005. 
Translated: unknown. See Also: Alternate Translation
Transcription/Markup: Ocean Press/Brian Baggins 
Copyright: © 2005 Aleida March, Che Guevara Studies Center and Ocean Press. Reprinted with their permission. Not to be reproduced in any form without the written permission of Ocean Press. For further information contact Ocean Press at info@oceanbooks.com.au and via its website at www.oceanbooks.com.au.

Audio Exerpt (Intro) | Audio Exerpt (Part 2)


Mr. President;
Distinguished delegates:

The delegation of Cuba to this Assembly, first of all, is pleased to fulfill the agreeable duty of welcoming the addition of three new nations to the important number of those that discuss the problems of the world here. We therefore greet, in the persons of their presidents and prime ministers, the peoples of Zambia, Malawi and Malta, and express the hope that from the outset these countries will be added to the group of Nonaligned countries that struggle against imperialism, colonialism and neocolonialism.

We also wish to convey our congratulations to the president of this Assembly [Alex Quaison-Sackey of Ghana], whose elevation to so high a post is of special significance since it reflects this new historic stage of resounding triumphs for the peoples of Africa, who up until recently were subject to the colonial system of imperialism. Today, in their immense majority these peoples have become sovereign states through the legitimate exercise of their self-determination. The final hour of colonialism has struck, and millions of inhabitants of Africa, Asia and Latin America rise to meet a new life and demand their unrestricted right to self-determination and to the independent development of their nations.

We wish you, Mr. President, the greatest success in the tasks entrusted to you by the member states.

Cuba comes here to state its position on the most important points of controversy and will do so with the full sense of responsibility that the use of this rostrum implies, while at the same time fulfilling the unavoidable duty of speaking clearly and frankly.

We would like to see this Assembly shake itself out of complacency and move forward. We would like to see the committees begin their work and not stop at the first confrontation. Imperialism wants to turn this meeting into a pointless oratorical tournament, instead of solving the serious problems of the world. We must prevent it from doing so. This session of the Assembly should not be remembered in the future solely by the number 19 that identifies it. Our efforts are directed to that end.

We feel that we have the right and the obligation to do so, because our country is one of the most constant points of friction. It is one of the places where the principles upholding the right of small countries to sovereignty are put to the test day by day, minute by minute. At the same time our country is one of the trenches of freedom in the world, situated a few steps away from U.S. imperialism, showing by its actions, its daily example, that in the present conditions of humanity the peoples can liberate themselves and can keep themselves free.

Leer más

Noviembre 25, 2013
Día Internacional de la Eliminación de la Violencia contra la Mujer

Today is the international day for the elimination of violence against women. In Peru as in the US, I believe we need to continue to promote respecting women in the streets as well as within our homes. An important, related bit of rhetoric out of Saudi Arabia (which I posted earlier) reads:

"Creemos en la ciudadanía integral de las mujeres, porque un niño no puede ser libre si su madre no lo es, y un hombre no es libre si su mujer no lo es. Los padres no son libres si sus hijas no lo son. Una sociedad no es nada si sus mujeres no son nada. La libertad comienza desde dentro. Soy libre, pero debo admitir que cuando voy a casa, en Arabia Saudí, esto no es así para todo el mundo. La lucha apenas ha comenzado. No sé cuánto durará ni cómo terminará, pero sé bien que una tormenta empieza con una gota. Y con el tiempo brotan las flores."

We believe in the integral citizenship of women, because a boy cannot be free if his mother is not, and a man is not free if his wife is not. Parents are not free if their daughters are not. A society is nothing if it’s women are nothing. Freedom begins from within. I am free, but I must admit that when I go home, in Saudi Arabia, it isn’t like this for everyone. The fight has only just begun. I don’t know how long it will take or how it will end, but I know well that a storm begins with a drop. And with time flowers burst forth. 

Change comes with small groups of committed individuals. Let’s be progressive; let’s be part of changing culturally entrenched gender inequality around the world.

Noviembre 6, 2013
La Lucha ya Comenzó - The Fight has just Begun

"Creemos en la ciudadanía integral de las mujeres, porque un niño no puede ser libre si su madre no lo es, y un hombre no es libre si su mujer no lo es. Los padres no son libres si sus hijas no lo son. Una sociedad no es nada si sus mujeres no son nada. La libertad comienza desde dentro. Soy libre, pero debo admitir que cuando voy a casa, en Arabia Saudí, esto no es así para todo el mundo. La lucha apenas ha comenzado. No sé cuánto durará ni cómo terminará, pero sé bien que una tormenta empieza con una gota. Y con el tiempo brotan las flores."

We believe in the integral citizenship of women, because a boy cannot be free if his mother is not, and a man is not free if his wife is not. Parents are not free if their daughters are not. A society is nothing if it’s women are nothing. Freedom begins from within. I am free, but I must admit that when I go home, in Saudi Arabia, it isn’t like this for everyone. The fight has only just begun. I don’t know how long it will take or how it will end, but I know well that a storm begins with a drop. And with time flowers burst forth. 

The following is a great article I read for my spanish classes here in Lima, Peru. It is the personal account of a woman from Saudi Arabia experiencing the rise of Islamic extremism and oppression of women. Her writing is beautiful and her commentary on La Primavera de la Mujer Saudi, or The Spring of the Saudi Woman, is very compelling.

La lucha ya comenzó


Esta es la historia de una mujer valiente que lucha por el derecho de las mujeres de vivir en libertad. Me llamo Manal al Sharif. Soy de Arabia Saudí. Quiero hablarles de dos capítulos de mi vida. El primero es la historia de mi
generación, y comienza el año en que nací: 1979. El 20 de noviembre de ese año se sitió La Meca, la ciudad más sagrada para los musulmanes. La capturó Yuhaimán al Otaibi, un rebelde islamista, con unos 400 seguidores. La ocupación duró dos semanas. Las autoridades saudíes tuvieron que recurrir a tropas fuertemente armadas para expulsar a los invasores y poner fin al sitio. Decapitaron en público a Yuhaimán y a sus hombres. Para los rebeldes, estos cambios iban en contra de sus creencias —contra el islam— y querían detenerlos a toda costa. Así el gobierno saudí, aunque había ejecutado a Yuhaimán, empezó a seguir su doctrina. Para evitar más insurrecciones, los extremistas que había en el poder revocaron las libertades que se habían tolerado en años anteriores. Al igual que Yuhaimán, algunos gobernantes saudíes llevaban mucho tiempo molestos con la relajación gradual de las restricciones impuestas a las mujeres. Por eso se prohibió toda actividad que alentara el contacto entre hombres y mujeres, como
la música y los cines, y la separación de los sexos se volvió ley en todas partes: sitios públicos, oficinas de gobierno, bancos, escuelas y hasta en nuestros propios hogares. Pasaron los años 80, y la década que siguió trajo la Guerra de Afganistán y el histórico fin de la Unión Soviética. Mientras, los
extremistas ganaban cada vez más poder en Arabia Saudí al promover sus ideas y obligar a todos a acatar sus reglas estrictas. Se repartían a manos llenas volantes, libros y casetes que llamaban a la yihad (guerra santa) en Afganistán e insistían en expulsar de la península arábiga a los no musulmanes. Entre quienes luchaban por la yihad había un hombre de 22 años llamado Osama bin Laden. Esos eran los héroes de nuestro tiempo.
Para los extremistas saudíes yo era awra, palabra que designa lo pecaminoso. Las mujeres no podíamos hacer deporte, asistir a la escuela de ingeniería, ni, por supuesto, conducir un vehículo. No teníamos voz, ni rostro, ni nombre. Nos habían robado la vida con una mentira. “Hacemos esto para protegerte de las miradas acechantes de los hombres”, nos decían. “Mereces que te traten como a una reina”. El 6 de noviembre de 1990, 47 valerosas mujeres desafiaron públicamente la prohibición de manejar y salieron a hacerlo por las calles de Riad. Fueron detenidas, se les prohibió salir del país y las despidieron de sus empleos. Recuerdo haber escuchado la
noticia cuando era niña. Se nos dijo entonces que esas mujeres eran malvadas. La televisión anunció que el ministro del Interior había advertido que las mujeres tenían prohibido manejar en el territorio nacional. Durante 22 años ni siquiera se nos permitió hablar sobre mujeres automovilistas, ya fuera en televisión, noticieros de radio, revistas o diarios. Así se creó un nuevo tabú. El
primero nos prohibía hablar de Yuhaimán; el segundo, de las mujeres conductoras. El cambio en mi vida se inició cuatro años después, en 2000. Ese año llegó Internet a Arabia Saudí. Era la primera vez que me conectaba en línea. Ahora, permítanme presentarles un retrato de la persona que era yo entonces: como extremista, me cubría el cuerpo desde la cabeza hasta los pies. Siempre había observado estrictamente esa costumbre. Me encantaba dibujar, pero un día que nos dijeron en la escuela que era pecado hacer representaciones de personas o animales, creí que debía obedecer. Cumpliendo mi obligación, reuní todas mis pinturas y dibujos y los prendí fuego. Entonces me di cuenta de que yo misma estaba en llamas por dentro. De la computadora había aprendido que aquello no era justo. Han de saber que Internet fue la primera puerta que permitió a la juventud árabe echar un vistazo al mundo exterior. Yo era joven y tenía sed de conocer otros pueblos y otras religiones. Entré en comunicación con personas que tenían distintos puntos de vista, y esas conversaciones no tardaron en hacer que me surgieran dudas. Me di cuenta de lo pequeño que era el mundo en el que había vivido hasta entonces, y me pareció todavía más pequeño una vez que salí de él. Poco a poco fui perdiendo la fobia a contaminar la pureza de mis creencias. Otro momento importante para mí fue el 11 de septiembre de 2001, un día clave para mucha gente de mi generación. Los extremistas dijeron que el 9/11 había sido el castigo de Dios a los Estados Unidos por lo que este país nos había hecho durante años. Yo no sabía qué bando tomar. Me habían educado para odiar a todo el que no fuera musulmán o no practicara el islam como lo concebíamos nosotros, pero en el noticiero de esa noche vi saltar a un hombre desde una de las torres del World Trade
Center. Se arrojó al vacío para escapar del fuego. Esa noche no pude dormir. La imagen me rondaba la cabeza y hacía sonar una alarma. Me decía que algo andaba mal. Ninguna religión puede ser tan sanguinaria, cruel y despiadada. Luego Al Qaeda reivindicó los ataques. Mis héroes no eran más que unos terroristas, ávidos de sangre. Fue el punto decisivo de mi vida.
Esto me lleva al segundo capítulo: la lucha por la libertad. La inspiración de este capítulo fue la Primavera Árabe. Una noche salí a las 9 de una consulta medica en la clínica y no pude conseguir que alguien me llevara en auto a casa. Un auto me siguió mientras caminaba, y los hombres que iban en él estuvieron a punto de secuestrarme. Al otro día me quejé a un compañero de trabajo de lo frustrante de que, a pesar de tener una licencia internacional para manejar debido a mis viajes al extranjero, no se me permitiera hacerlo en mi propio país por ser mujer. Él me respondió la cosa más simple:
—Pero si no hay ninguna ley que te lo impida. Una fatwa es un decreto religioso, no una ley civil. Esa verdad fundamental fue la que inició todo. Era junio de 2011 y un grupo de mujeres, todas saudíes, decidimos comenzar un movimiento: Conduce tu Propia Vida. Iba a ser una campaña muy directa, que
haría uso de las redes sociales y exhortaría a las mujeres a salir a la calle y conducir el 17 de junio. Invitaríamos a participar solo a las mujeres que tuvieran licencia internacional, pues no queríamos que hubiera accidentes. Ese día grabé un video de mí misma conduciendo. Usé mi rostro, mi voz y mi nombre verdaderos. Estaba decidida a hacerme escuchar. En otro tiempo me había avergonzado de ser quién era, una simple mujer, pero ya no. Subí el video a YouTube, y el primer día tuvo 700.000 vistas. A todas luces no estaba sola. El 17 de junio un centenar de mujeres valerosas salimos a manejar. Las calles de Riad estaban atestadas de patrulleros, y los vehículos de la policía religiosa se habían apostado en cada esquina. Pero no se detuvo a ninguna de las mujeres que participaron. Habíamos echado por tierra el tabú de no manejar. Al día siguiente me detuvieron y me sentenciaron a nueve días de cárcel. Hubo manifestaciones en toda Arabia Saudí, y la gente se dividió en dos bandos: uno que exigía un juicio en mi contra para que me azotaran en algún sitio público. Proliferaron páginas en Facebook para denunciarme, clamando que los hombres azotarían a toda mujer que osara romper el tabú y conducir. Las mujeres respondieron que les arrojarían zapatos, una manera sutil de aplicar a alguien el apelativo insultante de “perro”. Por lo visto, se había desencadenado una guerra abierta entre los sexos. No me di cuenta, hasta después de salir de la cárcel, de toda la gente a la que había esperanzado un simple acto que muchas mujeres realizan a diario. El apoyo que surgió en todo el mundo llevó a mi liberación. Sin embargo, no se trataba solo de conducir un auto, sino de llevar las riendas de nuestro destino. Ahora digo que puedo medir el impacto que tuvimos por la violencia de los ataques en nuestra contra. La explicación es muy simple: habíamos iniciado un movimiento a escala nacional. Lo llamamos la Primavera de la Mujer Saudí.
Creemos en la ciudadanía integral de las mujeres, porque un niño no puede ser libre si su madre no lo es, y un hombre no es libre si su mujer no lo es. Los padres no son libres si sus hijas no lo son. Una sociedad no es nada si sus mujeres no son nada. La libertad comienza desde dentro. Soy libre, pero debo admitir que cuando voy a casa, en Arabia Saudí, esto no es así para todo el mundo. La lucha apenas ha comenzado. No sé cuánto durará ni cómo terminará, pero sé bien que una tormenta empieza con una gota. Y con el tiempo brotan las flores.

Manal al Sharif vive en Dubai con su segundo esposo, un brasileño. Tiene derecho de ver al hijo que tuvo en su primer
matrimonio, hoy de siete años, pero solo durante las visitas de fin de semana que hace a Arabia Saudí.


Por Manal Al Sharif para Selecciones

Noviembre 5, 2013
The Santa Cruz trek: 50km of freedom, bull fights, and potato tossing

GO MERRRRRRRRRRANDA, getting publishedddddddddd.

Octubre 28, 2013
I feel like Will Hunting

When I listen to Elliot Smith I really start to feel like I should go to MIT and get a janitors job. And I’m also reminded of some awesome quotes from Good Will Hunting…

Will: Why shouldn’t I work for the N.S.A.? That’s a tough one, but I’ll take a shot. Say I’m working at N.S.A. Somebody puts a code on my desk, something nobody else can break. Maybe I take a shot at it and maybe I break it. And I’m real happy with myself, ‘cause I did my job well. But maybe that code was the location of some rebel army in North Africa or the Middle East. Once they have that location, they bomb the village where the rebels were hiding and fifteen hundred people I never met, never had no problem with, get killed. Now the politicians are sayin’, “Oh, send in the Marines to secure the area” ‘cause they don’t give a shit. It won’t be their kid over there, gettin’ shot. Just like it wasn’t them when their number got called, ‘cause they were pullin’ a tour in the National Guard. It’ll be some kid from Southie takin’ shrapnel in the ass. And he comes back to find that the plant he used to work at got exported to the country he just got back from. And the guy who put the shrapnel in his ass got his old job, ‘cause he’ll work for fifteen cents a day and no bathroom breaks. Meanwhile, he realizes the only reason he was over there in the first place was so we could install a government that would sell us oil at a good price. And, of course, the oil companies used the skirmish over there to scare up domestic oil prices. A cute little ancillary benefit for them, but it ain’t helping my buddy at two-fifty a gallon. And they’re takin’ their sweet time bringin’ the oil back, of course, and maybe even took the liberty of hiring an alcoholic skipper who likes to drink martinis and fuckin’ play slalom with the icebergs, and it ain’t too long ‘til he hits one, spills the oil and kills all the sea life in the North Atlantic. So now my buddy’s out of work and he can’t afford to drive, so he’s got to walk to the fuckin’ job interviews, which sucks ‘cause the shrapnel in his ass is givin’ him chronic hemorrhoids. And meanwhile he’s starvin’, ‘cause every time he tries to get a bite to eat, the only blue plate special they’re servin’ is North Atlantic scrod with Quaker State. So what did I think? I’m holdin’ out for somethin’ better. I figure fuck it, while I’m at it why not just shoot my buddy, take his job, give it to his sworn enemy, hike up gas prices, bomb a village, club a baby seal, hit the hash pipe and join the National Guard? I could be elected president.

Publicaciones que te gustan en Tumblr: Más publicaciones que te gustan »